French Last 100 Camino

On our, French Last 100 Camino, you will walk the famous last stage of Camino de Santiago, the “French Way”

Walking 115 km through Inland Spain

Noted as the most scenic section of the “French Way”. Known for its diversity in landscape. Be swept away by the sights and sounds as you meander through lush vegetation and rolling hills. Breathe in the fresh air while passing waterways and distant mountain ranges. Certainly, the historical landmarks and quaint villages will fuel your imagination of times gone by. Then Imagine yourself as a King or Queen as you pass over a Roman bridge or walk an ancient cobbled path. Be humbled as you enter Cathedrals that have survived the ravages of life yet still stand with spectacular architecture and stories from times gone by.

Connect daily, and enjoy the Spanish hospitality of the locals who feed and house you on your journey. There is no more intimate way to understand a culture than to walk on their land through the villages and cities of their hearts.

Relish in meeting Pilgrims from every corner of the world. Greeting one another with Buen Camino. Share stories, a meal, or drinks on a terrace at the end of a long day. Camino is as sociable or solitary as you need.

Galicia is a land rich in gastronomy.

Spain is known for its wonderful food. Veal and Seafood are the specialities of Galicia. Locals will tell you however with great pride that the seafood is noted to be the best in the world.  Don’t leave the country without experiencing some!

Compostela Certificate

Our Compostela Camino allows you to achieve a Compostela Certificate. If this is a dream of yours then you are required to stamp your Credencial Passport twice a day. Commencing with the first accommodation. Beyond that many bars, restaurants, and churches offer stamps along the way.

An achievement realised

As you reach Santiago de Compostela CELEBRATIONS will unfold! You have achieved walking the last 115km of an iconic pilgrimage.

Enjoy a rest in Santiago de Compostela where, in 1985, the city’s old town was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This alone is worth the effort you have made, a spectacular city with so much to offer.

Buen Camino!

 

Fisterra the “End of the world” 

Certainly, for some, the legends of the past will see you wanting to finish in Fisterra. Consider continuing on our Fisterra Camino.

If you have Special Needs we offer

Tailor-Made Packages 

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: km.
  • Hours: h.

Day 1 Sarria

Make your way to your hotel in Sarria. Hopefully, you will have time to wander through the old city and enjoy a nice meal while in this iconic town. Have a good nights’ rest before you head off on the first walking day of your Camino.

 

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 22 km.
  • Hours: 6h.

Day 2: Sarria – Portomarín

Today you face a beautiful stage through the Galician bush. Pretty villages and hamlets with their traditional “hórreos” (granaries). In Pina dos Corvos you will enjoy wonderful views of Belesar reservoir and the surrounding countryside.

From here there is a steep descent into Portomarín where you will cross the Miño River over its modern bridge into Portomarín.

The remains of the medieval town of Portomarín disappeared under these reservoir waters in the 1950s. Franco (Dictator) decided to build a hydroelectric dam 40 kilometres downriver and flooded the town of Portomarín. The most important monuments, the churches of San Nicolás, San Pedro and some of the cherished 16th and 17th-century manor houses or Pazos were transported stone by stone high above the river to the new village of Portomarin where you will stay today. The square in the centre of town boasts most of the historic monuments including the Pazo Del Conde da Maza.

 

 

  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Length: 25 km.
  • Hours: 7h.

Day 3: Portomarín – Palas de Rei

Today’s walk passes through similar landscapes as yesterday. Exit Portomarin by crossing the river Miño, Galicia’s longest river. Begin a steady uphill walk from 350m to 725m for 12km. A challenging yet not difficult section on and off the road.

In Ventas de Narón, you pass the small 13th century Ermita de Santa María Magdalena built by the Knights Templar. In Castromaior the circa 4BC to 1AD Roman ruins, are well worth the short detour off the Camino.

Your destination Palas de Rei, known as Palace of the King due to a king residing there, is a small country town. With plenty of shops, bars and cafes, most of town life revolves around the Plaza del Concello. Visit la Iglesia de San Tirso originally built in the 12th to early 13th century. It has undergone numerous changes over the centuries with the only original part of the church, the Romanesque doorway.

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 14.5 km.
  • Hours: 4h.

Day 4: Palas de Rei – Melide

You will be walking downhill for most of the way and crossing many creeks. This is a short day allowing you to enjoy the sights and gastronomy of Melide. A pretty little village set on a river.

Melide is a mandatory stop to enjoy Pulpo (octopus) in Galicia. Together with a Ribeiro wine, this is a meal famous in the area. Two of the most renowned octopus restaurants in Galicia are found here, Ezequiel and Garnacha.

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 14 km.
  • Hours: 4h.

Day 5: Melide – Arzua

From Melide for most of the way to Santiago, you will wind your way in and out of pine and eucalyptus forest. Then there is quite a steep descent into Ribadiso da Baixo.

Soon after arriving at the town of Arzúa. The most significant city (6,000 inhabitants) before Santiago. Famous for its local cheese Queixo Arzúa-Ulloa.

Visit the 14th-century Capilla de la Magdalena, all that is left of a former Augustinian monastery.

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 19.5 km.
  • Hours: 5h.

Day 6: Arzua – O Pedrouzo

A comfortable stage, quite flat, along prairies and bush. Alternating between track and county lanes, passing through several small hamlets.
Continuing along woodland paths, passing the monument to Guillermo Watt. He died at this spot, a day from completing his Camino.

Reaching Alto de Santa Irene, the high point of today with a good picnic area to rest.
O Pedrouzo is a small busy town with plenty of shops, restaurants and bars and the last stage of the Camino before entering Santiago de Compostela.

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 20 km.
  • Hours: 5.5h.

Day 7: O Pedrouzo – Santiago de Compostela

Today you face your last day of walking on your Camino!

The first half of the day runs through rural landscape, similar to the days prior.

From Lavacolla you walk past the airport. On highways and urban residential areas. Then you reach Monte do Gozo (Mount of Joy) 5km before the city centre, from here you will glimpse the spires of the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela.

The entrance to the old city of Santiago (100,000 inhabitants) is stunning. An incredible walk through the historic city streets leading you under the Arco del Obispo. Here you make your triumphant entrance into the Plaza del Obradoiro, Congratulations!

This night is one of celebration. The City will be brimming with Pilgrims and Locals alike enjoying the local cuisine and wines. Sharing tales of their Camino and for many saying farewells to their Camino Friends.

*Don’t forget to go and get your Compostela. The location will be noted on your daily map

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: km.
  • Hours: h.

Day 8: Santiago de Compostela

Today you will have your last breakfast as a Crossroads Travel Client

If you were late arriving yesterday you can attend the midday pilgrims mass and look around the famous Cathedral of St. James which forms the city’s heart and watch the collection of pilgrims arriving into the square as they finish their epic journey as you did yesterday.

The end of this unique experience, unless of course, you are heading to Fisterra!

Whatever it is you do from here please go safely, thank you for choosing Crossroads Travel
We hope to see you again sometime soon.

Buen Camino!!

Flexible. Set your own agenda

Inclusions Last 100 French Camino:

  • 7 nights’ accommodation, preferably charming/Iconic/boutique hotels and rural Casas
  • Private Bathroom in all rooms
  • Daily breakfast
  • Luggage transfer daily (1 x 20kg bag per person)
  • Maps of your accommodation locations
  • Pre-trip Camino guidance and planning
  • Australian and Spanish emergency phone numbers
  • local support person in Spain

Welcome Pack:

  • Pilgrim’s passport
  • Camino shell
  • Luggage tags
  • Full Camino walking guidebook with maps
  • Camino Journal with Pen
  • Other goodies for your Camino

Not Included 

  • Travel and medical insurance
  • Additional bags transfer (will incur additional costs)
  • Single Supplement
  • Any meal not specified in the Inclusions list
  • Any other item not specified in the Inclusions list
  • Flights/Transfers/Extra Accommodations.

Optional Services: 

  • Airport transfers from the start point and end destination
  • Extra night accommodation at the start point and end destination
  • Extra luggage transfer or storage
  • Fisterra experience: Tour from Santiago to Fisterra return 2 days
  • If you wish to upgrade to the Iconic Parador Hotel in Santiago de Compostela the cost is from $150 per person/per night twin share and $220 per person/per night single occupancy when booked 6 months in advance.
  • Ask us about adding an extra night in Santiago, or extra rest days en route.
  • For any part of your trip that falls between 31 October and 01 April, there is an out-of-season luggage transfer surcharge cost of $25 per day.

Day 1 Sarria

Make your way to your hotel in Sarria. Hopefully, you will have time to wander through the old city and enjoy a nice meal while in this iconic town. Have a good nights’ rest before you head off on the first walking day of your Camino.

 

Day 2: Sarria – Portomarín

Today you face a beautiful stage through the Galician bush. Pretty villages and hamlets with their traditional “hórreos” (granaries). In Pina dos Corvos you will enjoy wonderful views of Belesar reservoir and the surrounding countryside.

From here there is a steep descent into Portomarín where you will cross the Miño River over its modern bridge into Portomarín.

The remains of the medieval town of Portomarín disappeared under these reservoir waters in the 1950s. Franco (Dictator) decided to build a hydroelectric dam 40 kilometres downriver and flooded the town of Portomarín. The most important monuments, the churches of San Nicolás, San Pedro and some of the cherished 16th and 17th-century manor houses or Pazos were transported stone by stone high above the river to the new village of Portomarin where you will stay today. The square in the centre of town boasts most of the historic monuments including the Pazo Del Conde da Maza.

 

 

Day 3: Portomarín – Palas de Rei

Today’s walk passes through similar landscapes as yesterday. Exit Portomarin by crossing the river Miño, Galicia’s longest river. Begin a steady uphill walk from 350m to 725m for 12km. A challenging yet not difficult section on and off the road.

In Ventas de Narón, you pass the small 13th century Ermita de Santa María Magdalena built by the Knights Templar. In Castromaior the circa 4BC to 1AD Roman ruins, are well worth the short detour off the Camino.

Your destination Palas de Rei, known as Palace of the King due to a king residing there, is a small country town. With plenty of shops, bars and cafes, most of town life revolves around the Plaza del Concello. Visit la Iglesia de San Tirso originally built in the 12th to early 13th century. It has undergone numerous changes over the centuries with the only original part of the church, the Romanesque doorway.

Day 4: Palas de Rei – Melide

You will be walking downhill for most of the way and crossing many creeks. This is a short day allowing you to enjoy the sights and gastronomy of Melide. A pretty little village set on a river.

Melide is a mandatory stop to enjoy Pulpo (octopus) in Galicia. Together with a Ribeiro wine, this is a meal famous in the area. Two of the most renowned octopus restaurants in Galicia are found here, Ezequiel and Garnacha.

Day 5: Melide – Arzua

From Melide for most of the way to Santiago, you will wind your way in and out of pine and eucalyptus forest. Then there is quite a steep descent into Ribadiso da Baixo.

Soon after arriving at the town of Arzúa. The most significant city (6,000 inhabitants) before Santiago. Famous for its local cheese Queixo Arzúa-Ulloa.

Visit the 14th-century Capilla de la Magdalena, all that is left of a former Augustinian monastery.

Day 6: Arzua – O Pedrouzo

A comfortable stage, quite flat, along prairies and bush. Alternating between track and county lanes, passing through several small hamlets.
Continuing along woodland paths, passing the monument to Guillermo Watt. He died at this spot, a day from completing his Camino.

Reaching Alto de Santa Irene, the high point of today with a good picnic area to rest.
O Pedrouzo is a small busy town with plenty of shops, restaurants and bars and the last stage of the Camino before entering Santiago de Compostela.

Day 7: O Pedrouzo – Santiago de Compostela

Today you face your last day of walking on your Camino!

The first half of the day runs through rural landscape, similar to the days prior.

From Lavacolla you walk past the airport. On highways and urban residential areas. Then you reach Monte do Gozo (Mount of Joy) 5km before the city centre, from here you will glimpse the spires of the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela.

The entrance to the old city of Santiago (100,000 inhabitants) is stunning. An incredible walk through the historic city streets leading you under the Arco del Obispo. Here you make your triumphant entrance into the Plaza del Obradoiro, Congratulations!

This night is one of celebration. The City will be brimming with Pilgrims and Locals alike enjoying the local cuisine and wines. Sharing tales of their Camino and for many saying farewells to their Camino Friends.

*Don’t forget to go and get your Compostela. The location will be noted on your daily map

At Crossroads Travel our focus is to ensure your comfort after a long day of walking. Hence we have carefully and extensively researched accommodation options on Camino. 

Our choice is based on location.

We personally book your rooms for this reason we know exactly where they are located. Being in the vibe of Camino amongst the other pilgrims, restaurants, bars, and cafes is our primary aim.

Note: There are a few extraordinary options off the Camino. We will discuss this with you when booking.

Next, we want you to be welcomed and taken care of.

Meeting regularly with the owners/management to discuss our client needs ensures your hosts have direct personal contact with us. If any need arises we can manage it immediately. 

Finally, we choose accommodation preferably in charming, iconic hotels and rural Casas.

The number of stars is not our criteria. A comfortable room and a private bathroom come first. Although, yes, we do throw in a few nights with lots of stars for a bit of indulgence. After all, you deserve to have a soak in a spa. Likewise, an indoor pool doesn’t hurt.

Book 60 days in advance

Because Camino de Santiago is a very unique destination with limited quality accommodation ON Camino. Consequently, we advise booking a minimum of 60 days in advance.

Examples of our chosen accommodation.

Images below are examples of what you can expect from your booking. Tailor-made packages are available if you wish to stay 5-star all the way. 

ARRIVING at SARRIA:

These are the main options

From Barcelona:

  1. Fly to Santiago (1:50 h). From Santiago take the bus to Sarria (2:45 h)

From Madrid:

  1. Fly to Santiago (1:15 h). From Santiago take the bus to Sarria (2:45 h)
  2. Take the train to Sarria (6:00 h)

Taxi from Santiago Airport to Sarria:

We offer this service for pilgrims arriving at Santiago Airport.

Price (up to 4 pax) = 255 AUD

 Info
  • From - To: Sarria to Santiago
  • Length: 115 km
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Cost: $1,230
  • Dates:

    Flexible. Set your own agenda