Walk 200 km of the “French Way” on our Sarria to Fisterra Camino

One of the world’s most famous pilgrimages. Making your way first to Santiago de Compostela a vibrant Unesco World Heritage site where you will gain your Compostela Certificate and have a well-deserved rest day. Then continue to what is thought of as the spiritual end of Camino de Santiago, Fisterra, where legend tells tales of “The end of the World”. From here you will make your way to the Faro (lighthouse) where the 00.00 Camino Marker resides and watch the sunset well worth every step you have taken to get to this point. In Fisterra you also gain a Fisterrana Certificate of Completion. That will be two official achievements in one Camino!

Historically, Culturally and Spiritually rich land.

Find yourself amongst breathtaking scenery in the lush green rural Galician countryside. Hiking over rolling hills, through shaded woodlands, and quiet country roads. Walking across spectacular bridges and Roman paths. Eventually, you make your way towards the Wild Atlantic coastline where you will wander through eucalyptus forests, seaside villages, across sandy beaches and past rocky coves.

Visit Historical sites along the way that will humble you with their grandeur. Witness castles and ruins from kingdoms of times gone by that transport you to another reality. There will be moments when you are left in awe and speechless.

What to expect from your Camino.

An immersive and intimate way to understand a culture is on a walking adventure. Connect with the land and its locals as you wander through charming medieval villages, quaint hamlets and the magnificent cities of their homeland. Allow them to take care of you with a genuine passion they have for Pilgrims. Indeed they will prepare fantastic meals from local produce and also look after your every comfort in their establishments.

Don’t stop at the food though you have to wash it down with some local wine, you are in Spain after all!

Relish in meeting and greeting fellow Pilgrims

One of the gifts of Camino de Santiago is the people you meet who come from every corner of the planet. A cultural feast where strangers share stories, lots of laughs, and sometimes tears. A Coffee pit stop, drinks on a terrace or a meal or two with strangers who become friends. Ultimately, a unique experience that will forever stay with you.

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: km.
  • Hours: h.

SFC-Day 1: Sarria is a village alive with the Camino vibe. Make the most of your time here. Grab yourself a map and amble along Rua Major the main street. Then visit all of the historic delights this village has to offer. Iglesia de Santa Mariña, Monasterio de la Magdalena, medieval bridge Ponte Aspera, Capilla de San Lazaro and Torre de la Fortaleza, the remains of a once impressive castle, just to name a few.

 

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 22 km.
  • Hours: 6h.

Today SFC-Day 2: Sarria-Portomarin, you face a beautiful stage through the Galician bush. Pretty villages and hamlets with their traditional “hórreos” (granaries). In front of you is a steep descent into Portomarín where you will cross the Miño River over its modern bridge into Portomarín.

The remains of the medieval town of Portomarín disappeared under these reservoir waters in the 1950s. Franco (Dictator) decided to build a hydroelectric dam 40 kilometres downriver and flooded the original town.

The most important monuments are the churches of San Nicolás and San Pedro. Along with some of the cherished 16th and 17th-century manor houses or Pazos that were transported stone by stone high above the river to the new village of Portomarin. The square in the centre of town boasts most of the historic monuments including the Pazo Del Conde da Maza.

  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Length: 25 km.
  • Hours: 7h.

Today Day 3: Portomarin – Palas de Rei walk passes through similar landscapes as yesterday. As you exit Portomarin crossing the river Miño, Galicia’s longest river, you then begin a steady uphill walk from 350m to 725m. For 12km you face a challenging yet not difficult section on and off the road.

In Ventas de Narón, you pass the small 13th-century Ermita de Santa María Magdalena built by the Knights Templar. In Castromaior the circa 4BC to 1AD Roman ruins are well worth the short detour off the Camino.

Your destination Palas de Rei, is known as the Palace of the King due to a king residing there. You find a small country town with plenty of shops, bars and cafes. Most of town life revolves around the Plaza del Concello. Visit la Iglesia de San Tirso originally built in the 12th to early 13th century. It has undergone numerous changes over the centuries with the only original part of the church, the Romanesque doorway.

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 14.5 km.
  • Hours: 4h.

Today Day 4: Palas de Rei-Melide, you will be walking downhill for most of the way and crossing many creeks. This is a short day allowing you to enjoy the sights and gastronomy of Melide. A pretty little village set on a river.

Melide is a mandatory stop to enjoy Pulpo (octopus) in Galicia. Together with a Ribeiro wine, this is a meal famous in the area. Two of the most renowned octopus restaurants in Galicia, Ezequiel and Garnacha, are found here.

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 14 km.
  • Hours: 4h.

Today Day 5: Melide-Arzua, most of the way to Santiago, you will wind your way in and out of pine and eucalyptus forest. Then there is quite a steep descent into Ribadiso da Baixo.

Soon after arriving at the town of Arzúa. The most significant city (6,000 inhabitants) before Santiago. Famous for its local cheese Queixo Arzúa-Ulloa.

Visit the 14th-century Capilla de la Magdalena, all that is left of a former Augustinian monastery.

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 19.5 km.
  • Hours: 5h.

Today Day 6: Arzua-O Pedrouzo, a comfortable stage, quite flat, along prairies and bushes. Alternating between track and county lanes, passing through several small hamlets.
Continue on woodland paths, passing a monument to Guillermo Watt. A Pilgrim who died at this spot, a day prior to completing his Camino.

Eventually reaching Alto de Santa Irene, the high point of today. A good picnic and rest area.
O Pedrouzo is a small busy town with plenty of shops, restaurants and bars and the last stage of the Camino before entering Santiago de Compostela.

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 20 km.
  • Hours: 5.5h.

Today Day 7: O Pedrouzo-Santiago de Compostela, the first half of the day runs through a rural landscape, similar to days before.

From Lavacolla you walk past the airport, near highways and urban residential areas. Eventually reaching Monte do Gozo (Mount of Joy) 5km before the city centre. From here you will glimpse the spires of the Cathedral in Santiago.

The entrance to the old city of Santiago (100,000 inhabitants) is stunning. An incredible walk through the historic city streets leading you under the Arco del Obispo. Here you make your triumphant entrance into the Plaza del Obradoiro, Congratulations we have made it to the first Goal of our Camino!

*Don’t forget to go and get your Compostela. The location will be noted on your daily map

This night is one of celebration the City will be brimming with Pilgrims and Locals alike enjoying the local cuisine and wines. Sharing tales of their Camino and for many saying farewells to their Camino Friends

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: km.
  • Hours: h.

Today SFC-Day 8: Santiago de Compostela, you will have all day to yourself! No bag to put out in the foyer and no boots to lace up.

Santiago is a spectacular city with plenty on offer. It is also a good time if you need to stock up on your supplies, get a bit of housekeeping done and of course, explore the city.

Don’t overdo it though you will hit the path again tomorrow on your way to Fisterra!

Buen Camino!!

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 21 km.
  • Hours: 6h.

SFC-Day 9: Santiago-Negreira

As you leave the city fringes of Santiago you very quickly find yourself back in a rural landscape. When you arrive at Sarela de Abaxio look back to the incredible view of Santiago a magnificent, imposing sight of the Cathedral against the skyline.

This stage is very beautiful with eucalyptus, oak and pine bushes on gently rolling paths. Climb towards Alto do Vento (Wind pass), the only difficulty on today’s path. Then continue through small villages eventually arriving at the Tambre River. Cross Ponte Maceira a 14th-century bridge before coming to the medieval town of Negreira.

Take time to visit Pazo do Cotón, the country house of the Cotón family, and Saint Mauro’s chapel.

  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Length: 33.5 km.
  • Hours: 9h.

Today Day 10: Negreira-Olveiora, you face the most challenging stage on Fisterra Camino which is a long 33km’s. There are quite a few steep stages to the day and you will have to spend some time walking on asphalt roads.

However, there are also beautiful forests and meadows. Passing through small villages with many old Galician granaries hórreos (constructions made from stone or wood, raised above the ground by pillars and meant for storing crops). They are unique to rural Galician architecture and a distinguishing trait of the landscape.

Once in Vilaserío then through to Santa Mariña, you have a constant hilly walk.  Reaching a steep climb to Monte Aro. This is the highest point in Fisterra Camino. Enjoy the fantastic panoramic view. The path then continues through Fervenza reservoir and Hospital then finally descending into Olveiroa where you will cross the Xallas River via Ponte Olveiroa to your destination today.

  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Length: 21.5 km.
  • Hours: 6h.

Today Day 11: Olveiroa-Corcubión, you will experience mostly gentle gravel paths through peaceful open spaces reaching Alto do Cruceiro da Armada. Here is where you enjoy your first glimpse of the ocean, the bay of Fisterra. Finally, you’ll have a steep descent to Cee then continue to the quaint Heritage-listed village of Corcubión where you’ll stay tonight.

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 11 km.
  • Hours: 3h.

Today Day 12: Corcubión-Fisterra is your last day of walking Camino de Santiago! Enjoy incredible views over Cape Fisterra, pass through San Roque then descend to Estorde. Hugging the coast along Sardiñeiro and Langosteira Beach (an extraordinary sensation to walk on the sand, instead of land). Arriving at the vibrant village of Fisterra.

From the village, it is about 4km up to the Lighthouse. Here the 00.00 marker for Camino de Santiago is situated. Plan to be there for sunset if the day is clear you will be happy you did as the view is out of this world.

Congratulations! You have achieved your goal! 

Here you can reflect on your Camino. Contemplate the completion of your challenge, where it is said you leave the old behind you and walk into your new life.

Time to celebrate

It is said that Galicia has the best seafood in the world so tonight a feast should definitely be on your agenda.

Note; on the way to the lighthouse you can visit the municipal cemetery. Located on the edge of the coast, as you continue the climb up Mount Facho you will find a shrine dedicated to Saint William. Also “Cama de San Guillermo” (Saint William’s Bed). A pit excavated in the rock about the size of a human body. According to local legend women of the era laid to pray to the Saint for fertility. There are many myths and legends that all lend to this as a sacred site for fertility rituals that some still adhere to today.

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: km.
  • Hours: h.

Today Day 13: Fisterra, you will have your last breakfast on Camino de Santiago. A bittersweet moment where you will say your goodbyes as you wander off into the world with your heart full of memories, armed with your gifts from Camino de Santiago!

Whatever it is you do from here please go safely, thank you for choosing Crossroads Travel
We hope to see you again sometime soon.

Buen Camino!!

Dates: Flexible, set your own agenda

Direct deposit payments in $ AUD and € EU.

Inclusions Sarria to Fisterra Camino 
  • 12 nights’ accommodation preferably charming/Iconic/boutique hotels and rural Casas
  • Private Bathroom in all rooms
  • Daily breakfast
  • Luggage transfer daily (1 x 20kg bag per person)
  • Maps of your accommodation locations
  • Pre-trip Camino guidance and planning
  • Australian and Spanish emergency phone numbers
  • local support person in Spain
Welcome Pack:
  • Pilgrim’s passport
  • Camino shell
  • Luggage tags
  • Full Camino walking guidebook with maps
  • Camino Journal with Pen
  • Other goodies for your Camino
Not Included 
  • Travel and medical insurance
  • Additional bag transfer (will incur additional costs)
  • Single Supplement
  • Any meal not specified in the Inclusions list
  • Any other item not specified in the Inclusions list
  • Flights/Transfers/Extra Accommodations.
Optional Services: 
  • Airport transfers from the start point and end destination
  • Extra night accommodation at the start point and end destination
  • Extra luggage transfer or storage
  • Fisterra experience: Tour from Santiago to Fisterra return 2 days
  • If you wish to upgrade to the Iconic Parador Hotel in Santiago de Compostela the cost is from $180 per person/per night twin share and $250 per person/per night single occupancy when booked 6 months in advance.
  • Ask us about adding an extra night in Santiago, or extra rest days en route.
  • For any part of your trip that falls between 31 October and 01 April, there is an out-of-season luggage transfer surcharge of $25 per day. and $35 per day to Fisterra and Muxia.

SFC-Day 1: Sarria is a village alive with the Camino vibe. Make the most of your time here. Grab yourself a map and amble along Rua Major the main street. Then visit all of the historic delights this village has to offer. Iglesia de Santa Mariña, Monasterio de la Magdalena, medieval bridge Ponte Aspera, Capilla de San Lazaro and Torre de la Fortaleza, the remains of a once impressive castle, just to name a few.

 

Today SFC-Day 2: Sarria-Portomarin, you face a beautiful stage through the Galician bush. Pretty villages and hamlets with their traditional “hórreos” (granaries). In front of you is a steep descent into Portomarín where you will cross the Miño River over its modern bridge into Portomarín.

The remains of the medieval town of Portomarín disappeared under these reservoir waters in the 1950s. Franco (Dictator) decided to build a hydroelectric dam 40 kilometres downriver and flooded the original town.

The most important monuments are the churches of San Nicolás and San Pedro. Along with some of the cherished 16th and 17th-century manor houses or Pazos that were transported stone by stone high above the river to the new village of Portomarin. The square in the centre of town boasts most of the historic monuments including the Pazo Del Conde da Maza.

Today Day 3: Portomarin – Palas de Rei walk passes through similar landscapes as yesterday. As you exit Portomarin crossing the river Miño, Galicia’s longest river, you then begin a steady uphill walk from 350m to 725m. For 12km you face a challenging yet not difficult section on and off the road.

In Ventas de Narón, you pass the small 13th-century Ermita de Santa María Magdalena built by the Knights Templar. In Castromaior the circa 4BC to 1AD Roman ruins are well worth the short detour off the Camino.

Your destination Palas de Rei, is known as the Palace of the King due to a king residing there. You find a small country town with plenty of shops, bars and cafes. Most of town life revolves around the Plaza del Concello. Visit la Iglesia de San Tirso originally built in the 12th to early 13th century. It has undergone numerous changes over the centuries with the only original part of the church, the Romanesque doorway.

Today Day 4: Palas de Rei-Melide, you will be walking downhill for most of the way and crossing many creeks. This is a short day allowing you to enjoy the sights and gastronomy of Melide. A pretty little village set on a river.

Melide is a mandatory stop to enjoy Pulpo (octopus) in Galicia. Together with a Ribeiro wine, this is a meal famous in the area. Two of the most renowned octopus restaurants in Galicia, Ezequiel and Garnacha, are found here.

Today Day 5: Melide-Arzua, most of the way to Santiago, you will wind your way in and out of pine and eucalyptus forest. Then there is quite a steep descent into Ribadiso da Baixo.

Soon after arriving at the town of Arzúa. The most significant city (6,000 inhabitants) before Santiago. Famous for its local cheese Queixo Arzúa-Ulloa.

Visit the 14th-century Capilla de la Magdalena, all that is left of a former Augustinian monastery.

Today Day 6: Arzua-O Pedrouzo, a comfortable stage, quite flat, along prairies and bushes. Alternating between track and county lanes, passing through several small hamlets.
Continue on woodland paths, passing a monument to Guillermo Watt. A Pilgrim who died at this spot, a day prior to completing his Camino.

Eventually reaching Alto de Santa Irene, the high point of today. A good picnic and rest area.
O Pedrouzo is a small busy town with plenty of shops, restaurants and bars and the last stage of the Camino before entering Santiago de Compostela.

Today Day 7: O Pedrouzo-Santiago de Compostela, the first half of the day runs through a rural landscape, similar to days before.

From Lavacolla you walk past the airport, near highways and urban residential areas. Eventually reaching Monte do Gozo (Mount of Joy) 5km before the city centre. From here you will glimpse the spires of the Cathedral in Santiago.

The entrance to the old city of Santiago (100,000 inhabitants) is stunning. An incredible walk through the historic city streets leading you under the Arco del Obispo. Here you make your triumphant entrance into the Plaza del Obradoiro, Congratulations we have made it to the first Goal of our Camino!

*Don’t forget to go and get your Compostela. The location will be noted on your daily map

This night is one of celebration the City will be brimming with Pilgrims and Locals alike enjoying the local cuisine and wines. Sharing tales of their Camino and for many saying farewells to their Camino Friends

Today SFC-Day 8: Santiago de Compostela, you will have all day to yourself! No bag to put out in the foyer and no boots to lace up.

Santiago is a spectacular city with plenty on offer. It is also a good time if you need to stock up on your supplies, get a bit of housekeeping done and of course, explore the city.

Don’t overdo it though you will hit the path again tomorrow on your way to Fisterra!

Buen Camino!!

SFC-Day 9: Santiago-Negreira

As you leave the city fringes of Santiago you very quickly find yourself back in a rural landscape. When you arrive at Sarela de Abaxio look back to the incredible view of Santiago a magnificent, imposing sight of the Cathedral against the skyline.

This stage is very beautiful with eucalyptus, oak and pine bushes on gently rolling paths. Climb towards Alto do Vento (Wind pass), the only difficulty on today’s path. Then continue through small villages eventually arriving at the Tambre River. Cross Ponte Maceira a 14th-century bridge before coming to the medieval town of Negreira.

Take time to visit Pazo do Cotón, the country house of the Cotón family, and Saint Mauro’s chapel.

Today Day 10: Negreira-Olveiora, you face the most challenging stage on Fisterra Camino which is a long 33km’s. There are quite a few steep stages to the day and you will have to spend some time walking on asphalt roads.

However, there are also beautiful forests and meadows. Passing through small villages with many old Galician granaries hórreos (constructions made from stone or wood, raised above the ground by pillars and meant for storing crops). They are unique to rural Galician architecture and a distinguishing trait of the landscape.

Once in Vilaserío then through to Santa Mariña, you have a constant hilly walk.  Reaching a steep climb to Monte Aro. This is the highest point in Fisterra Camino. Enjoy the fantastic panoramic view. The path then continues through Fervenza reservoir and Hospital then finally descending into Olveiroa where you will cross the Xallas River via Ponte Olveiroa to your destination today.

Today Day 11: Olveiroa-Corcubión, you will experience mostly gentle gravel paths through peaceful open spaces reaching Alto do Cruceiro da Armada. Here is where you enjoy your first glimpse of the ocean, the bay of Fisterra. Finally, you’ll have a steep descent to Cee then continue to the quaint Heritage-listed village of Corcubión where you’ll stay tonight.

Today Day 12: Corcubión-Fisterra is your last day of walking Camino de Santiago! Enjoy incredible views over Cape Fisterra, pass through San Roque then descend to Estorde. Hugging the coast along Sardiñeiro and Langosteira Beach (an extraordinary sensation to walk on the sand, instead of land). Arriving at the vibrant village of Fisterra.

From the village, it is about 4km up to the Lighthouse. Here the 00.00 marker for Camino de Santiago is situated. Plan to be there for sunset if the day is clear you will be happy you did as the view is out of this world.

Congratulations! You have achieved your goal! 

Here you can reflect on your Camino. Contemplate the completion of your challenge, where it is said you leave the old behind you and walk into your new life.

Time to celebrate

It is said that Galicia has the best seafood in the world so tonight a feast should definitely be on your agenda.

Note; on the way to the lighthouse you can visit the municipal cemetery. Located on the edge of the coast, as you continue the climb up Mount Facho you will find a shrine dedicated to Saint William. Also “Cama de San Guillermo” (Saint William’s Bed). A pit excavated in the rock about the size of a human body. According to local legend women of the era laid to pray to the Saint for fertility. There are many myths and legends that all lend to this as a sacred site for fertility rituals that some still adhere to today.

Today Day 13: Fisterra, you will have your last breakfast on Camino de Santiago. A bittersweet moment where you will say your goodbyes as you wander off into the world with your heart full of memories, armed with your gifts from Camino de Santiago!

Whatever it is you do from here please go safely, thank you for choosing Crossroads Travel
We hope to see you again sometime soon.

Buen Camino!!

At Crossroads Travel your comfort after a long day of walking is our focus. Hence extensively researched accommodation options on Camino de Santiago are a part of our packages.

Our choice is based on location.

We personally book your rooms, and for this reason, we know exactly where they are located. Our primary aim is for you to be in the vibe of Camino amongst the other pilgrims, restaurants, bars, and cafes.

We want you to be welcomed and taken care of.

Meeting regularly with the owners/management to discuss our client needs ensures your hosts have direct personal contact with us. If any needs arise we can manage them immediately.

Finally, we choose accommodation in charming, iconic hotels and rural Casas.

The number of stars is not our criterion. A comfortable room and a private bathroom come first. In some of the more humble areas of Camino de Santiago, we offer you the best of what is possible. So the longer your Camino the more varied your accommodation will be. This is part of the charm of being on Camino de Santiago, remember you are not on a holiday with multiple options in one spot. Fortunately, with options in the bigger cities, we can throw in a few nights with lots of stars for indulgence. After all, you deserve to have a soak in a spa. Likewise, an indoor pool doesn’t hurt.  Note: There are a few extraordinary options off the Camino if “humble” is not your thing. Also If we locate you outside of the Camino you will have contact with the owners who will pick you up from the Camino and deliver you back to the same spot the next morning. We will discuss this with you when booking.

Book 60 days in advance

Camino de Santiago is a unique destination with limited quality accommodation ON Camino hence we advise booking at least 60 days in advance.

Examples of our chosen accommodation.

Images below are examples of what you can expect from your booking. Tailor-made Packages are available if you wish to stay 5-star all the way.  Please note: we adhere to the same standard when you book accommodation with us pre and post-Camino in Spain and Portugal.  

 

There are many options, depending on where you are departing from, however, these are our suggestions based on the easiest connections to the Camino once in Spain:

Fly to Madrid and catch the train to Sarria.

Fly to Santiago and catch a Train or Bus to Sarria

AUD: Australian dollar ($) ^
 Info
  • From - To: SARRIA TO FISTERRA
  • Length: 202 KM
  • Difficulty: EASY
  • Cost: $2,070
  • Dates:

    Dates: Flexible, set your own agenda

    Direct deposit payments in $ AUD and € EU.

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