Experience the essence of walking a Pilgrimage while taking in the main milestones of the French Way with our Milestones Camino. Starting in the Iconic French town of St Jean Pied de Port, walk and travel for 20 spectacular days to Santiago de Compostela.

Milestones along the way.

The “French Way” was inscribed as a Unesco World Heritage site in 1993. Witness many historic and symbolic sites on one of the most famous Pilgrimages in the world. Find yourself in awe of the spectacular, the grand, and the humble all rolled into one journey.

Listed here are what are considered the main milestones;

St Jean Pied de Port

The Gateway of the “French Way” was founded in the 12th century by the kings of Navarre.
Famous for its medieval architecture and fortifications. See the 15th Century Porte Saint-Jacques, one of the four gates of the town’s medieval wall. The evening Pilgrim Mass sets the tone for your Pilgrimage, attend in the church of Notre Dame where a blessing is given especially for Pilgrims.

Pyrenees Mountains

While you cross the pass with its sheep grazing and cowbells ringing you will be transported to another reality. Despite the effort needed to climb, it will undoubtedly be the views that leave you breathless.

La Virgen de Biakorri

One of the first of many symbolic sites to witness on Camino de Santiago is La Virgen de Biakorri. Sitting around the 12km mark of the mountain pass, known as patroness and protector of shepherds, their pastures, and all who cross the mountain.

Roncesvalles

Crossing the French and Spanish border by foot is challenging yet rewarding. However it is worth every step as you arrive at Roncesvalles, the first stop on the Spanish side of the mountain range which will certainly have you spellbound. From here you will walk for 3 days through some incredible landscapes and villages until you arrive in Pamplona.

Pamplona

A beautiful old town with its Gothic cathedral, several museums and parks to explore. This lively and historic city has plenty to admire.

Then relax into travel mode.

Move forward by train over 3 days and enjoy the history, culture and gourmet delights on offer in these important city centres.

From Astorga, you will walk every day heading towards Santiago de Compostela and pass the following milestones;

Knights Templar Castle

Dating back to the 12th century located in Ponferrada is the Knights Templar Castle. A fascinating historical site built by the Knights Templar; A medieval military and religious order that protected pilgrims on Camino de Santiago. The castle is one of the best-preserved examples of Templar architecture in Spain, offering a glimpse into the life and culture of this influential order.

Cruz de Ferro

Standing on a large pile of stones is a simple iron cross atop a wooden pole. An iconic stop on Camino de Santiago is Cruz de Ferro a place of spiritual significance. Many pilgrims leave a stone or a personal item at the base of the cross as a symbol of gratitude or a gesture of leaving a burden behind for yourself or a loved one.

O Cebreiro 

The first village of Galicia, a mountain-top hamlet with the most unforgettable panoramic views. Famous for its traditional Celtic roundhouses, called pallozas, with stone walls and thatched roofs. There is also the legend of the Holy Grail of Galicia. The relics of this miracle are kept in the parish church of Santa María la Real, built on the site in the 9th century.

Monte do Gozo

Meaning “Hill of Joy” is a significant landmark for pilgrims because it is the first place where pilgrims can see the spires of the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela. You see the end in sight and understand at that moment that you are close to achieving your goal.

Santiago de Compostela

Congratulations, you just walked 262km into Santiago de Compostela. Celebrate in this vibrant Unesco World Heritage-listed City. You can collect your Compostela and be proud of your achievement! Go to the Pilgrims Mass and explore the many wonders of this unique city.

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Rest day
  • Length: km.
  • Hours: h.

Today Day 1: St Jean Pied de Port, the gateway to the “French Way”, situated in the Basque country at the foothills of the Pyrenees Mountains. A beautiful village, akin to a Fairy-tale scene. Cobbled narrow streets, with white stone houses with red wooden windows and doors. Walk across the spectacularly beautiful bridge leading you out of the village towards the Pyrenees Mountains. The beginning of the French Way of Camino de Santiago, the start of your Pilgrimage.

Make sure you wander the streets of St Jean Pied de Port and soak up the French charm. Try some local French cuisine before passing over the Pyrenees mountains into Sapin. Then make a point of joining the pilgrims’ mass in the evening, a great way to connect with other Pilgrims and mark the start of your journey.

Take advantage of your hotel room to relax and have a good night’s sleep before beginning your Camino. You have a huge first day in front of you.

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Length: 24.5 km.
  • Hours: 8.5h.

Today Day 2: St Jean Pied de Port-Roncesvalles is a long and difficult day especially since it is the first. Before setting out check the weather forecast in the pilgrim’s office at the top of the main street, 39 Rue de la Citadelle. You will be advised of an alternative route if the weather is dangerous, ultimately it is your call.

Walk through the village across the bridge and head to the mountains for a very steep climb, starting at 172m above sea level. You will pass Huntto and Orisson before reaching Vierge de Biakorri, the statue of Madonna at 1.095m. She sits on top of a rock protecting the shepherds in these beautiful mountains. Continue to cross the Pyrenees through Lepoeder mountain pass 1.430m high, then a 480m descent to Roncesvalles (950m), crossing a beautiful beech forest.

Roncesvalles is the primary starting point for pilgrims, mainly Spaniards. Visit St James Chapel and the Real Colegiata de Santa María de Roncesvalles

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Length: 21.5 km.
  • Hours: 6h.

Today Day 3: Roncesvalles-Zubiri, begins at almost 1000m above sea level, and ends in Zubiri, at 526m. You will mainly be on undulating downward tracks, however, you will climb two small mountain passes, Mezquiriz and Alto de Erro.
At the peak of Alto de Erro, you will begin a difficult descent. This section is very rocky and needs your complete attention.

If you have knee problems it may be advisable for you to enjoy the view from the top and then jump in a Taxi to Zubiri.
Do not be a hero, listen to your body, it is not a defeat if you can’t manage this section, it is simply smart management. You have to take care of your body, you have a long way to go. For those that are physically ready, the difficulty is compensated for, by breathtaking views.

Zubiri is a quaint village on the Arga River. There is a wonderful Romanic bridge Puente de Piedra waiting for you to cross it. After you cross the bridge take some time on the river’s edge to soak your feet in the cool water.

Buen Camino

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 21 km.
  • Hours: 5.5h.

Today Day 4/5: Zubiri-Pamplona, you will follow the Arga River on what is essentially an easy day. You will pass through many small villages on paths through woods and on roads. Crossing from side to side of the Arga River over several beautiful old bridges.
In Irotz you cross via the Roman bridge of Iturgaiz to the next town Zabaldika where you will find a picnic area close to the road.

At this point there are two possible routes: the original Camino de Santiago or continuing to follow the river through Huarte, both will lead to the same junction a few kilometres along. For the last 5 km, you will cross into the urban area of Pamplona.

Pamplona is the capital of Navarre province in northern Spain home to Gothic-style churches including a fortress like San Nicolás. Here you will enjoy your well-deserved rest day. There is so much to see and do in this magnificent city.

Buen Camino

  • Difficulty: Rest day
  • Length: km.
  • Hours: h.

Take the train from Pamplona to Burgos which takes about 2 hours and 30 minutes(details will be in your welcome pack)

Burgos is a spectacular, historically rich City boasting many ancient remains throughout.

Visit one of the most extraordinary Gothic Cathedrals in the whole of Spain (declared a World Heritage site by Unesco in 1984), located in Santa Maria Plaza, built over a period of 200 years. Combining French Gothic, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque styles.

Other points of interest are the famous Puente (bridge) San Pablo built in the 13th century, lined with Statues of Castilian noblemen from the Middle Ages. The Arch of Santa Maria is a stone relic from the 14th century. Paseo del Espolon, Monasterio de las Huelgas, and so much more.

You can also visit a futuristic-looking building, the Museum of Human Evolution with remains, dating back 800,000 years.

While you are there try some unusual local Gastronomical treats: the famous blood sausage Morcilla, Lechazo, wood oven slow-roasted lamb, and queso (cheese) de Burgos, a white soft cheese eaten with a glass of local wine.

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Rest day
  • Length: -1 km.
  • Hours: h.

Catch the Train from Burgos to Leon which takes about 1 hour and 22 minutes (details will be in your welcome pack)

On Day 6: Explore Leon, a lively Unesco World Heritage listed City one of the largest on Camino de Santiago. So much to see and do. Many churches and cathedrals noted for their architecture and art can be discovered in Leon. Among them is the Gothic 13th-century Cathedral de Leon. Indeed a spectacle of beauty with its towers and flying buttresses. Also boasts Romanesque architecture of the 10th century Basílica de San Isidoro. Known for its frescoes and royal tombs.  Then a must-visit, Casa Botines, a neogothic-styled building designed by Antoni Gaudi.
Famous for its facade of carved skulls and scallops is the Parador Hotel in the city centre. Indeed a visit there will leave you speechless.
Once you have done your touristy visits head to Barrio Húmedo and Barrio Romántico, both areas are close to the Cathedral and known for food and fun! full of narrow streets and plazas. Here socialising and gastronomy are on the agenda. A time to rest and enjoy a variety of taverns, bars, restaurants, and terraces,
If you are struggling with any of your walking equipment this is a good time to update. There are several outdoor shops and a large department store Corte Ingles to cater to your needs.

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Rest day
  • Length: km.
  • Hours: h.

Catch the train from Leon to Astorga takes about 45 minutes (details will be in your welcome pack)

On Day 7: Explore Astorga, with its rich historical and cultural heritage. When reaching the pretty hilltop city of Astorga one of the must-do is to visit its spectacular Gothic “Pink Cathedral”. Built in 1471 it now houses a museum. Also, the fabulous Episcopal palace designed by Antoni Gaudí, (the famous Catalan architect) is well worth a look as are the old Roman city walls.

Astorga is also known for its gastronomy, especially its Cocido Maragato, a stew of meat and vegetables. Astorga is well known for its famous chocolates and “Las Mantecadas (cupcakes) de Astorga”. Something to look forward to trying while there.

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Length: 20 km.
  • Hours: 5.5h.

Today Day 8: Astorga-Rabanal Del Camino start your way towards León Mountains on paths where you will be surrounded by heather, oak, and broom. The ascent is soft and progressive up to Rabanal Del Camino.
Witness to your left, for several days, the magnificent view of “El Teleno”, the highest mountain summit in León Camino. 2,188m above sea level, escorting you towards Galicia.
Passing through several beautiful villages, Santa Catalina de Somoza and El Ganso.
Soon you will reach Rabanal Del Camino 1,150m high, a beautiful little town where you can eat the famous and very hearty Cocido Maragato.

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Length: 25 km.
  • Hours: 8h.

Today Day 9: Rabanal Del Camino-Molinaseca is a spectacular stage, however, it is very unpredictable weather generally cold most of the year. Take something warm in your backpack.

You will have a difficult steep ascent to the beautiful village of Foncebadon. A lost village in the middle of the mountain. Continue to climb to “Cruz de Ferro”(Iron Cross) 1.504m, which is the most symbolic milestone in the entire Camino. A bit further you find the “Collado de las Antenas” 1.515m, the highest point on the French Camino. Of course, take some time to enjoy the stunning view.
Start your descent to the lush area of El Bierzo. You will experience a challenging descent to Molinaseca, probably the hardest on Camino together with the decline to Zubiri, encountered at the very beginning. The most difficult section is between the Collado down to Acebo. Please take your time and take care of your ankles and knees. In bad weather, we suggest walking the road instead of the way.
You will enter Molinaseca crossing its beautiful Romanesque Pilgrim’s Bridge, a picturesque town that looks a little like a movie set, sitting at the foot of the mountain. Its narrow streets and historic buildings are spectacular.

Buen Camino

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 8 km.
  • Hours: 2h.

Today Day 10: Molinaseca-Ponferada, you have an effortless and short walk into Ponferrada. The last big city on the way to Santiago de Compostela.

Ponferrada is mentioned in the Codex Calixtinus, a 12th-century guidebook for pilgrims and noted as a place where the Camino passes. The city received its name from ‘Pons Ferrata’, meaning Iron Bridge in Latin. The bridge was built in the 11th century to help pilgrims cross the Sil River. Today you can visit the medieval Knights Templar Castle, established in the 12th century to protect pilgrims on their way to Santiago.

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 19.5 km.
  • Hours: 5.5h.

Take the bus from Ponferrada to Villafranca Del Bierzo trip takes about 30 to 35 minutes (details in welcome pack)

Today Day 11: Villafranca Del Bierzo-Las Herrerias you have a pleasant walking day in front of you, gentle paths in the countryside. Soon enter the Valcarce riverside forest, with superb chestnut trees, then onto Trabadelo, a good place to stop for a drink and rest.

You may hear a change in the language with locals speaking Galician, the language of Galicia and bordering regions.

Tomorrow is a short yet big day so make sure you get a good night’s rest.

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Length: 8 km.
  • Hours: 3.5h.

Today Day 12: Las Herrerias-O’Cebreiro, you face the iconic milestone of the Camino, the climb up to O’Cebreiro. The hardest section is between Las Herrerias and La Laguna, 500m in 5.5 km. You cross the border between Castilla and Galicia and realise the day was well worth every step, the views are spectacular. you walk mainly through a landscape with oak, beech, chestnut, and gum trees.
O’Cebreiro is the first village in Galicia, a delightful hilltop hamlet. From here we have a spectacular 360º view. This image will remain in your mind forever.

O’Cebreiro is an iconic location for its outlook, church, legends, and its “Pallozas”, typical Galician construction, round stone houses with a straw roof.
After a hard day’s walk, you will enjoy the specialties of this land: Pulpo (octopus) and the local Cebreiro cheese.
Make sure you get to the Pilgrims’ Mass whether you are religious or not the Mass here has a special spirit as does this land.

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 22 km.
  • Hours: 6h.

Today Day 13: Sarria-Portomarín you face a beautiful stage through the Galician bush. Pretty villages and hamlets with their traditional “hórreos” (granaries). There is a steep descent into Portomarín where you will cross the Miño River over its modern bridge into Portomarín.

The remains of the medieval town of Portomarín disappeared under these reservoir waters in the 1950s. Franco (Dictator) built a hydroelectric dam 40 kilometres downriver and flooded the town of Portomarín. The most important monuments, the churches of San Nicolás, San Pedro and some of the cherished 16th and 17th-century manor houses or Pazos were transported stone by stone high above the river to the new village of Portomarin where you will stay today. The square in the centre of town boasts most of the historic monuments including the Pazo Del Conde da Maza.

Buen Camino! 

  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Length: 25 km.
  • Hours: 7h.

Today Day 14: Portomarin-Palas de Rei passes through similar landscape as yesterday. As you exit Portomarin crossing the river Miño, Galicia’s longest river, you then begin a steady uphill walk from 350m to 725m. For 12km you face a challenging yet not difficult section on and off the road.

In Ventas de Narón, you pass the small 13th-century Ermita de Santa María Magdalena built by the Knights Templar. In Castromaior the circa 4BC to 1AD Roman ruins are well worth the short detour off the Camino.

Your destination Palas de Rei, is known as the Palace of the King due to a king residing there. You find a small country town with plenty of shops, bars and cafes. Most of town life revolves around the Plaza del Concello. Visit la Iglesia de San Tirso originally built in the 12th to early 13th century. It has undergone numerous changes over the centuries with the only original part of the church, the Romanesque doorway.

Buen Caminno!

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 14.5 km.
  • Hours: 4h.

Today Day 15: Palas de Rei-Melide, You will be walking down gentle rolling hills for most of the day and crossing many creeks. This is a comfortable walking day arriving at Melide a pretty little village set on a river.

in Galicia,  Melide is famous for its Pulpo (octopus) usually boiled and sprinkled with red pepper and paprika. Have this with a Ribeiro wine, a meal famous in the area.

Two of the most renowned octopus restaurants in Galicia are found here, Ezequiel and Garnach

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 14 km.
  • Hours: 4h.

Today Day 16: Melide – Arzua, you will wind your way in and out of pine and eucalyptus forest. There is quite a steep descent into Ribadiso da Baixo.

Soon after arriving at the town of Arzúa. The most significant city (6,000 inhabitants) before Santiago. Famous for its local cheese Queixo Arzúa-Ulloa. Here you will also meet Pilgrims from the Camino Norte trail as the two paths merge.

Visit the 14th-century Capilla de la Magdalena, all that is left of a former Augustinian monastery.

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 19.5 km.
  • Hours: 5h.

Today Day 17: Arzua-O Pedrouzo , a comfortable stage, quite flat, along prairies and bushes. Alternating between track and county lanes, passing through several small hamlets.
Continue on woodland paths, passing a monument to Guillermo Watt. A Pilgrim who died at this spot, a day prior to completing his Camino.

Eventually reaching Alto de Santa Irene, the high point of today. A good picnic and rest area.
O Pedrouzo is a small busy town with plenty of shops, restaurants and bars and the last stage of the Camino before entering Santiago de Compostela.

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Length: 20 km.
  • Hours: 5.5h.

Today Day 18: O Pedrouzo-Santiago de Compostela, the first half of the day runs through a rural landscape, similar to days before.

From Lavacolla you walk past the airport, near highways and urban residential areas. Eventually reaching Monte do Gozo (Mount of Joy) 5km before the city centre. From here you will glimpse the spires of the Cathedral in Santiago.

The entrance to the old city of Santiago (100,000 inhabitants) is stunning. An incredible walk through the historic city streets leading you under the Arco del Obispo. Here you make your triumphant entrance into the Plaza del Obradoiro, Congratulations a great achievement!

*Don’t forget to go and get your Compostela. The location will be noted on your daily map

This night is one of celebration the City will be brimming with Pilgrims and Locals alike enjoying the local cuisine and wine. Sharing tales of their Camino and for many saying farewells to their Camino Friends

Buen Camino!

  • Difficulty: Rest day
  • Length: km.
  • Hours: h.

Enjoy Day 19 in Santiago de Compostela, you have a full day to explore this Historic City with its many specialised Tapas bars and restaurants. Meet up with other pilgrims with whom you have shared joys and sorrows during your many days on Camino de Santiago. Some people you will never meet again, while others will become friends for the rest of your life.

Buen Camino! 

  • Difficulty: Rest day
  • Length: km.
  • Hours: h.

Day 20: Santiago de Compostela, If you arrived in Santiago de Compostela late yesterday you can attend the midday pilgrims mass and look around the famous Cathedral of St. James which forms the city’s heart. Watch the collection of pilgrims arriving at the square as they finish their epic journey as you did yesterday. Make the most of your time in this Unesco Heritage Listed City and stroll through its narrow streets before you head off.

Wherever you are off to in the world, safe travels and thanks for allowing Crossroads Travel to support you on your Camino Adventure, we hope to see you again

Buen Camino! 

Dates: Flexible, set your own agenda

Direct deposit payments in $ AUD and € EU.

Inclusions  Milestones Camino 
  • 19 nights’ accommodation preferably charming/Iconic/boutique hotels and rural Casas
  • Private Bathroom in all rooms
  • Daily breakfast
  • Luggage transfer daily (1 x 20 kg bag per person)
  • Maps of your accommodation locations
  • Pre-trip Camino guidance and planning
  • Australian and Spanish emergency phone numbers
  • local support person in Spain
Welcome Pack:
  • Pilgrim’s passport
  • Camino shell
  • Luggage tags
  • Full Camino walking guidebook with maps
  • Camino Journal with Pen
  • Other goodies for your Camino
Not Included 
  • Travel and medical insurance
  • Additional bag transfer (will incur additional costs)
  • Single Supplement
  • Any meal not specified in the Inclusions list
  • Any other item not specified in the Inclusions list
  • Flights/Transfers/Extra Accommodations.
Optional Services: 
  • Airport transfers from the start point and end destination
  • Extra night accommodation at the start point and end destination
  • Extra luggage transfer or storage
  • Fisterra experience: Tour from Santiago to Fisterra return 2 days
  • If you wish to upgrade to the Iconic Parador Hotel in Santiago de Compostela the cost is from $180 per person/per night twin share and $250 per person/per night single occupancy when booked 6 months in advance.
  • Ask us about adding an extra night in Santiago, or extra rest days en route.
  • For any part of your trip that falls between 31 October and 01 April, there is an out-of-season luggage transfer surcharge of $25 per day. and $35 per day to Fisterra and Muxia.

Today Day 1: St Jean Pied de Port, the gateway to the “French Way”, situated in the Basque country at the foothills of the Pyrenees Mountains. A beautiful village, akin to a Fairy-tale scene. Cobbled narrow streets, with white stone houses with red wooden windows and doors. Walk across the spectacularly beautiful bridge leading you out of the village towards the Pyrenees Mountains. The beginning of the French Way of Camino de Santiago, the start of your Pilgrimage.

Make sure you wander the streets of St Jean Pied de Port and soak up the French charm. Try some local French cuisine before passing over the Pyrenees mountains into Sapin. Then make a point of joining the pilgrims’ mass in the evening, a great way to connect with other Pilgrims and mark the start of your journey.

Take advantage of your hotel room to relax and have a good night’s sleep before beginning your Camino. You have a huge first day in front of you.

Buen Camino!

Today Day 2: St Jean Pied de Port-Roncesvalles is a long and difficult day especially since it is the first. Before setting out check the weather forecast in the pilgrim’s office at the top of the main street, 39 Rue de la Citadelle. You will be advised of an alternative route if the weather is dangerous, ultimately it is your call.

Walk through the village across the bridge and head to the mountains for a very steep climb, starting at 172m above sea level. You will pass Huntto and Orisson before reaching Vierge de Biakorri, the statue of Madonna at 1.095m. She sits on top of a rock protecting the shepherds in these beautiful mountains. Continue to cross the Pyrenees through Lepoeder mountain pass 1.430m high, then a 480m descent to Roncesvalles (950m), crossing a beautiful beech forest.

Roncesvalles is the primary starting point for pilgrims, mainly Spaniards. Visit St James Chapel and the Real Colegiata de Santa María de Roncesvalles

Buen Camino!

Today Day 3: Roncesvalles-Zubiri, begins at almost 1000m above sea level, and ends in Zubiri, at 526m. You will mainly be on undulating downward tracks, however, you will climb two small mountain passes, Mezquiriz and Alto de Erro.
At the peak of Alto de Erro, you will begin a difficult descent. This section is very rocky and needs your complete attention.

If you have knee problems it may be advisable for you to enjoy the view from the top and then jump in a Taxi to Zubiri.
Do not be a hero, listen to your body, it is not a defeat if you can’t manage this section, it is simply smart management. You have to take care of your body, you have a long way to go. For those that are physically ready, the difficulty is compensated for, by breathtaking views.

Zubiri is a quaint village on the Arga River. There is a wonderful Romanic bridge Puente de Piedra waiting for you to cross it. After you cross the bridge take some time on the river’s edge to soak your feet in the cool water.

Buen Camino

Today Day 4/5: Zubiri-Pamplona, you will follow the Arga River on what is essentially an easy day. You will pass through many small villages on paths through woods and on roads. Crossing from side to side of the Arga River over several beautiful old bridges.
In Irotz you cross via the Roman bridge of Iturgaiz to the next town Zabaldika where you will find a picnic area close to the road.

At this point there are two possible routes: the original Camino de Santiago or continuing to follow the river through Huarte, both will lead to the same junction a few kilometres along. For the last 5 km, you will cross into the urban area of Pamplona.

Pamplona is the capital of Navarre province in northern Spain home to Gothic-style churches including a fortress like San Nicolás. Here you will enjoy your well-deserved rest day. There is so much to see and do in this magnificent city.

Buen Camino

Take the train from Pamplona to Burgos which takes about 2 hours and 30 minutes(details will be in your welcome pack)

Burgos is a spectacular, historically rich City boasting many ancient remains throughout.

Visit one of the most extraordinary Gothic Cathedrals in the whole of Spain (declared a World Heritage site by Unesco in 1984), located in Santa Maria Plaza, built over a period of 200 years. Combining French Gothic, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque styles.

Other points of interest are the famous Puente (bridge) San Pablo built in the 13th century, lined with Statues of Castilian noblemen from the Middle Ages. The Arch of Santa Maria is a stone relic from the 14th century. Paseo del Espolon, Monasterio de las Huelgas, and so much more.

You can also visit a futuristic-looking building, the Museum of Human Evolution with remains, dating back 800,000 years.

While you are there try some unusual local Gastronomical treats: the famous blood sausage Morcilla, Lechazo, wood oven slow-roasted lamb, and queso (cheese) de Burgos, a white soft cheese eaten with a glass of local wine.

Buen Camino!

Catch the Train from Burgos to Leon which takes about 1 hour and 22 minutes (details will be in your welcome pack)

On Day 6: Explore Leon, a lively Unesco World Heritage listed City one of the largest on Camino de Santiago. So much to see and do. Many churches and cathedrals noted for their architecture and art can be discovered in Leon. Among them is the Gothic 13th-century Cathedral de Leon. Indeed a spectacle of beauty with its towers and flying buttresses. Also boasts Romanesque architecture of the 10th century Basílica de San Isidoro. Known for its frescoes and royal tombs.  Then a must-visit, Casa Botines, a neogothic-styled building designed by Antoni Gaudi.
Famous for its facade of carved skulls and scallops is the Parador Hotel in the city centre. Indeed a visit there will leave you speechless.
Once you have done your touristy visits head to Barrio Húmedo and Barrio Romántico, both areas are close to the Cathedral and known for food and fun! full of narrow streets and plazas. Here socialising and gastronomy are on the agenda. A time to rest and enjoy a variety of taverns, bars, restaurants, and terraces,
If you are struggling with any of your walking equipment this is a good time to update. There are several outdoor shops and a large department store Corte Ingles to cater to your needs.

Buen Camino!

Catch the train from Leon to Astorga takes about 45 minutes (details will be in your welcome pack)

On Day 7: Explore Astorga, with its rich historical and cultural heritage. When reaching the pretty hilltop city of Astorga one of the must-do is to visit its spectacular Gothic “Pink Cathedral”. Built in 1471 it now houses a museum. Also, the fabulous Episcopal palace designed by Antoni Gaudí, (the famous Catalan architect) is well worth a look as are the old Roman city walls.

Astorga is also known for its gastronomy, especially its Cocido Maragato, a stew of meat and vegetables. Astorga is well known for its famous chocolates and “Las Mantecadas (cupcakes) de Astorga”. Something to look forward to trying while there.

Buen Camino!

Today Day 8: Astorga-Rabanal Del Camino start your way towards León Mountains on paths where you will be surrounded by heather, oak, and broom. The ascent is soft and progressive up to Rabanal Del Camino.
Witness to your left, for several days, the magnificent view of “El Teleno”, the highest mountain summit in León Camino. 2,188m above sea level, escorting you towards Galicia.
Passing through several beautiful villages, Santa Catalina de Somoza and El Ganso.
Soon you will reach Rabanal Del Camino 1,150m high, a beautiful little town where you can eat the famous and very hearty Cocido Maragato.

Buen Camino!

Today Day 9: Rabanal Del Camino-Molinaseca is a spectacular stage, however, it is very unpredictable weather generally cold most of the year. Take something warm in your backpack.

You will have a difficult steep ascent to the beautiful village of Foncebadon. A lost village in the middle of the mountain. Continue to climb to “Cruz de Ferro”(Iron Cross) 1.504m, which is the most symbolic milestone in the entire Camino. A bit further you find the “Collado de las Antenas” 1.515m, the highest point on the French Camino. Of course, take some time to enjoy the stunning view.
Start your descent to the lush area of El Bierzo. You will experience a challenging descent to Molinaseca, probably the hardest on Camino together with the decline to Zubiri, encountered at the very beginning. The most difficult section is between the Collado down to Acebo. Please take your time and take care of your ankles and knees. In bad weather, we suggest walking the road instead of the way.
You will enter Molinaseca crossing its beautiful Romanesque Pilgrim’s Bridge, a picturesque town that looks a little like a movie set, sitting at the foot of the mountain. Its narrow streets and historic buildings are spectacular.

Buen Camino

Today Day 10: Molinaseca-Ponferada, you have an effortless and short walk into Ponferrada. The last big city on the way to Santiago de Compostela.

Ponferrada is mentioned in the Codex Calixtinus, a 12th-century guidebook for pilgrims and noted as a place where the Camino passes. The city received its name from ‘Pons Ferrata’, meaning Iron Bridge in Latin. The bridge was built in the 11th century to help pilgrims cross the Sil River. Today you can visit the medieval Knights Templar Castle, established in the 12th century to protect pilgrims on their way to Santiago.

Buen Camino!

Take the bus from Ponferrada to Villafranca Del Bierzo trip takes about 30 to 35 minutes (details in welcome pack)

Today Day 11: Villafranca Del Bierzo-Las Herrerias you have a pleasant walking day in front of you, gentle paths in the countryside. Soon enter the Valcarce riverside forest, with superb chestnut trees, then onto Trabadelo, a good place to stop for a drink and rest.

You may hear a change in the language with locals speaking Galician, the language of Galicia and bordering regions.

Tomorrow is a short yet big day so make sure you get a good night’s rest.

Buen Camino!

Today Day 12: Las Herrerias-O’Cebreiro, you face the iconic milestone of the Camino, the climb up to O’Cebreiro. The hardest section is between Las Herrerias and La Laguna, 500m in 5.5 km. You cross the border between Castilla and Galicia and realise the day was well worth every step, the views are spectacular. you walk mainly through a landscape with oak, beech, chestnut, and gum trees.
O’Cebreiro is the first village in Galicia, a delightful hilltop hamlet. From here we have a spectacular 360º view. This image will remain in your mind forever.

O’Cebreiro is an iconic location for its outlook, church, legends, and its “Pallozas”, typical Galician construction, round stone houses with a straw roof.
After a hard day’s walk, you will enjoy the specialties of this land: Pulpo (octopus) and the local Cebreiro cheese.
Make sure you get to the Pilgrims’ Mass whether you are religious or not the Mass here has a special spirit as does this land.

Buen Camino!

Today Day 13: Sarria-Portomarín you face a beautiful stage through the Galician bush. Pretty villages and hamlets with their traditional “hórreos” (granaries). There is a steep descent into Portomarín where you will cross the Miño River over its modern bridge into Portomarín.

The remains of the medieval town of Portomarín disappeared under these reservoir waters in the 1950s. Franco (Dictator) built a hydroelectric dam 40 kilometres downriver and flooded the town of Portomarín. The most important monuments, the churches of San Nicolás, San Pedro and some of the cherished 16th and 17th-century manor houses or Pazos were transported stone by stone high above the river to the new village of Portomarin where you will stay today. The square in the centre of town boasts most of the historic monuments including the Pazo Del Conde da Maza.

Buen Camino! 

Today Day 14: Portomarin-Palas de Rei passes through similar landscape as yesterday. As you exit Portomarin crossing the river Miño, Galicia’s longest river, you then begin a steady uphill walk from 350m to 725m. For 12km you face a challenging yet not difficult section on and off the road.

In Ventas de Narón, you pass the small 13th-century Ermita de Santa María Magdalena built by the Knights Templar. In Castromaior the circa 4BC to 1AD Roman ruins are well worth the short detour off the Camino.

Your destination Palas de Rei, is known as the Palace of the King due to a king residing there. You find a small country town with plenty of shops, bars and cafes. Most of town life revolves around the Plaza del Concello. Visit la Iglesia de San Tirso originally built in the 12th to early 13th century. It has undergone numerous changes over the centuries with the only original part of the church, the Romanesque doorway.

Buen Caminno!

Today Day 15: Palas de Rei-Melide, You will be walking down gentle rolling hills for most of the day and crossing many creeks. This is a comfortable walking day arriving at Melide a pretty little village set on a river.

in Galicia,  Melide is famous for its Pulpo (octopus) usually boiled and sprinkled with red pepper and paprika. Have this with a Ribeiro wine, a meal famous in the area.

Two of the most renowned octopus restaurants in Galicia are found here, Ezequiel and Garnach

Buen Camino!

Today Day 16: Melide – Arzua, you will wind your way in and out of pine and eucalyptus forest. There is quite a steep descent into Ribadiso da Baixo.

Soon after arriving at the town of Arzúa. The most significant city (6,000 inhabitants) before Santiago. Famous for its local cheese Queixo Arzúa-Ulloa. Here you will also meet Pilgrims from the Camino Norte trail as the two paths merge.

Visit the 14th-century Capilla de la Magdalena, all that is left of a former Augustinian monastery.

Today Day 17: Arzua-O Pedrouzo , a comfortable stage, quite flat, along prairies and bushes. Alternating between track and county lanes, passing through several small hamlets.
Continue on woodland paths, passing a monument to Guillermo Watt. A Pilgrim who died at this spot, a day prior to completing his Camino.

Eventually reaching Alto de Santa Irene, the high point of today. A good picnic and rest area.
O Pedrouzo is a small busy town with plenty of shops, restaurants and bars and the last stage of the Camino before entering Santiago de Compostela.

Buen Camino!

Today Day 18: O Pedrouzo-Santiago de Compostela, the first half of the day runs through a rural landscape, similar to days before.

From Lavacolla you walk past the airport, near highways and urban residential areas. Eventually reaching Monte do Gozo (Mount of Joy) 5km before the city centre. From here you will glimpse the spires of the Cathedral in Santiago.

The entrance to the old city of Santiago (100,000 inhabitants) is stunning. An incredible walk through the historic city streets leading you under the Arco del Obispo. Here you make your triumphant entrance into the Plaza del Obradoiro, Congratulations a great achievement!

*Don’t forget to go and get your Compostela. The location will be noted on your daily map

This night is one of celebration the City will be brimming with Pilgrims and Locals alike enjoying the local cuisine and wine. Sharing tales of their Camino and for many saying farewells to their Camino Friends

Buen Camino!

Enjoy Day 19 in Santiago de Compostela, you have a full day to explore this Historic City with its many specialised Tapas bars and restaurants. Meet up with other pilgrims with whom you have shared joys and sorrows during your many days on Camino de Santiago. Some people you will never meet again, while others will become friends for the rest of your life.

Buen Camino! 

Day 20: Santiago de Compostela, If you arrived in Santiago de Compostela late yesterday you can attend the midday pilgrims mass and look around the famous Cathedral of St. James which forms the city’s heart. Watch the collection of pilgrims arriving at the square as they finish their epic journey as you did yesterday. Make the most of your time in this Unesco Heritage Listed City and stroll through its narrow streets before you head off.

Wherever you are off to in the world, safe travels and thanks for allowing Crossroads Travel to support you on your Camino Adventure, we hope to see you again

Buen Camino! 

At Crossroads Travel your comfort after a long day of walking is our focus. Hence extensively researched accommodation options on Camino de Santiago are a part of our packages.

Our choice is based on location.

We personally book your rooms, and for this reason, we know exactly where they are located. Our primary aim is for you to be in the vibe of Camino amongst the other pilgrims, restaurants, bars, and cafes.

We want you to be welcomed and taken care of.

Meeting regularly with the owners/management to discuss our client needs ensures your hosts have direct personal contact with us. If any needs arise we can manage them immediately.

Finally, we choose accommodation in charming, iconic hotels and rural Casas.

The number of stars is not our criterion. A comfortable room and a private bathroom come first. In some of the more humble areas of Camino de Santiago, we offer you the best of what is possible. So the longer your Camino the more varied your accommodation will be. This is part of the charm of being on Camino de Santiago, remember you are not on a holiday with multiple options in one spot. Fortunately, with options in the bigger cities, we can throw in a few nights with lots of stars for indulgence. After all, you deserve to have a soak in a spa. Likewise, an indoor pool doesn’t hurt. 

Note: There are a few extraordinary options off the Camino if “humble” is not your thing. Also If we locate you outside of the Camino you will have contact with the owners who will pick you up from the Camino and deliver you back to the same spot the next morning. We will discuss this with you when booking.

Book 60 days in advance

Camino de Santiago is a unique destination with limited quality accommodation ON Camino hence we advise booking a minimum of 60 days in advance. The sooner you book the better the options that will be available. 

Examples of our chosen accommodation.

Images below are examples of what you can expect from your booking. Tailor-made Packages are available if you wish to stay 5-star all the way. 

Please note: we adhere to the same standard when you book accommodation with us pre and post-Camino in Spain, France and Portugal.  

 

There are several ways to get to Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port by public transport, depending on where you are coming from. Here are some of the best options:

  • If you are coming from Paris, you can take a high-speed train (TGV) to Bayonne, and then a regional train (TER) to Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port. This journey takes about 6 hours in total.
  • If you are coming from Biarritz, you can take a bus from the city centre or the airport to Bayonne, and then a regional train (TER) to Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port. This journey takes about 2 hours in total.
  • If you are coming from Pamplona, you can take a bus from the city centre or the airport to Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port. This journey takes about 2 hours in total. You can check the bus schedules and prices on the ALSA website.
  • If you are coming from San Sebastián, you can take a local train (Euskotren) to Hendaye, and then a regional train (TER) to Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port. This journey takes about 3 hours in total.
  • You can take a train from Madrid to Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port via Zaragoza and Pamplona. This is the fastest and most comfortable option, but also the most expensive. The train takes about 5 hours and 25 minutes and costs between 40 and 89 euros.
AUD: Australian dollar ($) ^
 Info
  • From - To: St Jean Pied de Port to Santiago de Compostela
  • Length: 262.5
  • Difficulty: MED
  • Cost: $3,630
  • Dates:

    Dates: Flexible, set your own agenda

    Direct deposit payments in $ AUD and € EU.

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